aside The Recording Academy President/CEO Neil Portnow will begin preparing leadership transition

The Recording Academy™ announced today that President/CEO Neil Portnow will begin preparing for a leadership transition after choosing not to seek an extension on his current contract, which expires in July 2019. Portnow shared his plans at the Recording Academy’s semi-annual Board of Trustees meeting last week. Throughout the next year, Portnow will work with the Board to chart out an organizational succession and transition plan, while continuing his current work as active President/CEO of the Recording Academy and MusiCares®, and Chair of the Board of the GRAMMY Museum®.

Neil Portnow will leave his position in 2019Portnow, who, prior to serving as President/CEO, served on the Recording Academy’s Board of Trustees, is largely credited with strengthening the Recording Academy’s financial health and brand. Neil Portnow is the longest serving President in the Recording Academy’s 60-year history. Key milestones achieved under Portnow’s 16-year tenure include:

The Recording Academy established advocacy as a hallmark of its Washington, D.C., office, giving music creators a voice on Capitol Hill, and stressing the need to update federal music laws, especially in the wake of the digital music revolution. Last month, after 15 years of advocacy work, and on the heels of the organization’s GRAMMYs on the Hill Awards and Advocacy Day, the Music Modernization Act, which helps bring copyright laws and artist protection into the 21st century, was passed in the House of Representatives and introduced in the Senate.

As the Recording Academy’s leading charity, MusiCares provided more than $5.9 million to 7,900 members of the music industry in the last fiscal year alone—the largest number of clients served and dollars distributed in a single year in the charity’s history—and anticipates it will provide $6.3 million to nearly 9,000 members of the music industry this fiscal year, again reaching new milestones. Since its inception in 1989, MusiCares has distributed approximately $60 million to music people in need. During Portnow’s tenure, MusiCares provided relief efforts to the music community impacted by Hurricane Katrina, Hurricane Harvey, and the recent natural disasters in Florida, Puerto Rico, and California.
As a part of Portnow’s vision of preserving, crafting, and sharing music stories with people around the world, and amplifying the Recording Academy’s already robust, innovative, and impactful music education programs for youth, the Recording Academy established the first GRAMMY Museum in Los Angeles in 2008. The Museum has since expanded its presence domestically and internationally.

Neil Portnow oversaw a landmark 10-year broadcast deal with CBS to keep the show—one of television’s major entertainment events, ranking as one of the highest-rated and most-watched specials—on CBS through 2026.

In addition to presiding over the GRAMMY Awards®, Neil Portnow expanded the Recording Academy’s telecast portfolio, more than tripling the organization’s television footprint, with a number of new specials, including GRAMMY Salutes to Elton John, the Bee Gees, Stevie Wonder, the Beatles, and Whitney Houston, as well as the PBS “Great Performances” series honoring GRAMMY Lifetime Achievement Award and Special Merit Award recipients.
In 2017, the GRAMMY Music Education Coalition united more than 30 of the nation’s most forward-thinking music education organizations with the goal of increasing the number of youth actively participating in creating, playing, and performing music in U.S. public schools.

After 58 years of traditional balloting, the GRAMMY Awards successfully moved to an online voting platform.

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